The McMinn Centre - Excellence in Hips & Knees Hip Resurfacing
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Welcome to The McMinn Centre, specialising in bone-conserving hip and knee procedures for young & active patients
Mr Derek McMinn MD FRCS - Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon
Mr. Derek McMinn, Birmingham Hip Surgeon
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Arthritis - Joint Pain FAQ

This section is a guide to learning about arthritis. It look at the different types of arthritis, things you can do to combat pain in the early stages and the different surgical options available to you at The McMinn Centre. Arthritic joint pain can vary from being a little uncomfortable to debilitating and lasting pain, The McMinn Centre can offer a range of surgical treatment options to combat hip and knee arthritis.

Click on the links below to take you to the particular section.

What is arthritis?

Arthritis is a general term covering more than 100 different conditions.

The term arthritis literally means inflammation of a joint, but is generally used to describe any condition in which there is damage to the cartilage. Inflammation is the body's natural response to injury. The warning signs that inflammation presents are redness, swelling, heat and pain.

The cartilage is a padding that absorbs stress. The proportion of cartilage damage  and synovial inflammation varies with the type and stage of arthritis. Usually the pain early on is due to inflammation. In the later stages, when the cartilage is worn away, most of the pain comes from the mechanical friction of raw bones rubbing on each other. The Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) is a bone-conserving surgical treatment option for patients who suffer from the latter stages of arthritis. Developed by Derek McMinn in 1997, the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) is the first widely successful hip resurfacing device. Mr McMinn's first 1000 BHRs at 15 years show a staggering survivorship of 95.8% across both genders. In males only this rises to 98% at 15 years with the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing implanted by Derek McMinn.


What are the different types of arthritis?

There are over 100 different types of arthritis. The most common are:

Osteoarthritis

Also called degenerative joint disease, this is the most common type of arthritis, which occurs most often in older people. This disease affects cartilage, the tissue that cushions and protects the ends of bones in a joint. With osteoarthritis, the cartilage starts to wear away over time. In extreme cases, the cartilage can completely wear away, leaving nothing to protect the bones in a joint, causing bone-on-bone contact. Bones may also bulge, or stick out at the end of a joint, called a bone spur.

Osteoarthritis causes joint pain and can limit a person's normal range of motion (the ability to freely move and bend a joint), this can have a big impact of the patients activity levels and lifestyle. At The McMinn Centre we pride ourselves on combating arthritic pain and restoring patient activity levels and lifestyles using a range of bone-conserving hip arthroplasty implants and knee replacements.

Rheumatoid arthritis

This is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system (the body's way of fighting infection) attacks healthy joints, tissues, and organs. Occurring most often in women of childbearing age (15-44), this disease inflames the lining (or synovium) of joints. It can cause pain, stiffness, swelling, and loss of function in joints. When severe, rheumatoid arthritis can deform, or change, a joint. For example, the joints in a person's finger can become deformed, causing the finger to bend or curve.

Rheumatoid arthritis affects mostly joints of the hands and feet and tends to be symmetrical. This means the disease affects the same joints on both sides of the body (like both hands or both feet) at the same time and with the same symptoms. No other form of arthritis is symmetrical. About two to three times as many women as men have this disease.

Fibromyalgia

This chronic disorder causes pain throughout the tissues that support and move the bones and joints. Pain, stiffness, and localized tender points occur in the muscles and tendons, particularly those of the neck, spine, shoulders, and hips. Fatigue and sleep disturbances may also occur.

Gout

When a person has gout, they have higher than normal levels of uric acid in the blood. The body makes uric acid from many of the foods we eat. Too much uric acid causes deposits, called uric acid crystals, to form in the fluid and lining of the joints. The result is an extremely painful attack of arthritis. The most common joint gout affects is the big toe. This disease is more common in men than in women.

Infectious arthritis

Arthritis can be caused by an infection, either bacterial or viral, such as Lyme disease. When this disease is caused by bacteria, early treatment with antibiotics can ease symptoms and cure the disease.

Reactive arthritis

This is arthritis that develops after a person has an infection in the urinary tract, bowel, or other organs. People who have this disease often have eye problems, skin rashes, and mouth sores.

Psoriatic arthritis

Some people who have psoriasis, a common skin problem that causes scaling and rashes, also have arthritis. This disease often affects the joints at the ends of the fingers and can cause changes in the fingernails and toenails. Sometimes the spine can also be affected.

Systemic lupus erythematosus

Also called lupus or SLE, this is an autoimmune disease. When a person has an autoimmune disease, the immune system attacks itself, killing healthy cells and tissue, rather than doing its job to protect the body from disease and infection. Lupus can inflame and damage a person's joints, skin, kidneys, lungs, blood vessels, heart, and brain. African American women are three times more likely to get lupus than Caucasian women. It is also more common in Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian women.

Ankylosing spondylitis

This disease most often affects the spine, causing pain and stiffness. It can also cause arthritis in the hips, shoulders, and knees. It affects mostly men in their late teenage and early adult years.

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

The most common type of arthritis in children, this disease causes pain, stiffness, swelling, and loss of function in the joints. A young person can also have rashes and fevers with this disease.

Polymyalgia rheumatica

Because this disease involves tendons, muscles, ligaments, and tissues around the joint, symptoms often include pain, aching, and morning stiffness in the shoulders, hips, neck, and lower back. It is sometimes the first sign of giant cell arteritis, a disease of the arteries characterized by inflammation, weakness, weight loss, and fever.

Polymyositis

Causing inflammation and weakness in the muscles, this disease can affect the whole body and cause disability.

Bursitis

This condition involves inflammation of the bursa, small, fluid-filled sacs that help reduce friction between bones and other moving structures in the joints. The inflammation may result from arthritis in the joint or injury or infection of the bursa. Bursitis produces pain and tenderness and may limit the movement of nearby joints.

Tendinitis

Also called tendonitis, this condition refers to inflammation of tendons (tough cords of tissue that connect muscle to bone) caused by overuse, injury, or a rheumatic condition. Tendinitis produces pain and tenderness and may restrict movement of nearby joints.


During a consultation Mr McMinn and his team assess each patient carefully and thoroughly before deciding on the best treatment options for that individual based on their needs and the one that will give the patient the best outcome. Booking a consultation to Derek McMinn couldn't be simpler, click here to book online, call (+44) 0121 455 0411 or email enquiries@mcminncentre.co.uk.


What causes osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis is caused by the wearing out of the cartilage covering the bone ends in a joint. This may be due to excessive strain over prolonged periods of time, or due to other joint diseases, injury or deformity.

Primary osteoarthritis is commonly associated with ageing and general degeneration of joints. Younger people are also increasingly seeing  their lives disrupted by arthritic pain. Quite often people who are particularly active and sporty (runners, footballers, golfers etc) see this cartilage degeneration accelerated and the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) is ideal for the younger age group. The BHR can offer the longevity and stability demanded by this young and active group of patients. Watch patient case studies and examples of patient who have got back to being active after BHR surgery here.

Secondary osteoarthritis is generally the consequence of another disease or condition, such as repeated trauma or surgery to the affected joint, or abnormal joint structures from birth.

Uric acid crystal build-up is the cause of gout and long-term crystal build-up in the joints may cause deformity.

Some people may have congenital abnormalities of the joints-for example, Perthes' disease of the hips-that cause early degeneration and subsequently cause osteoarthritis.


Predisposing factors to osteoarthritis of hip

Some conditions may predispose the hip to osteoarthritis, it tends to affect people as they get older and particularly affects joints that have to take a lot of stresses and strains.
  • A previous fracture that involved the hip
  • Growth abnormalities of the hip (such as a shallow socket, also called dysplasia) may lead to premature arthritis
  • Some childhood hip problems later cause hip arthritis (for example, a type of childhood hip fracture known as a Slipped Epiphysis (SUFE); also Legg-Perthe's Disease)
  • Inactive lifestyle- e.g., Obesity (overweight) Your weight is the single most important link between diet and arthritis, as being overweight puts an additional burden on your hips, knees, ankles and feet.
If you think that you have osteoarthritis of hip and would like to book a consultation with Mr McMinn you can do so easily by clicking here to book online, calling (+44) 0121 455 0411 or emailing enquiries@mcminncentre.co.uk. At The McMinn Centre we have several hip resurfacing and hip replacement surgery options available for patients. Use the links below to read more about a couple of the hip surgery implant options available.

The Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR)
The Birmingham Mid Head Resection (BMHR)
 

Predisposing factors to osteoarthritis of knee

Abnormalities of knee joint function resulting from fractures of the knee, torn cartilage and torn ligaments can lead to degeneration many years after the injury. The mechanical abnormality leads to excessive wear and tear - just like the out-of-balance tyre that wears out too soon on your car.

If you think that you have osteoarthritis of knee and would like to book a consultation with Mr McMinn you can do so easily by clicking here to book online, calling (+44) 0121 455 0411 or emailing enquiries@mcminncentre.co.uk. Mr McMinn uses the Birmingham Knee Replacement (BKR), a knee implant that offers unique design characteristics allowing patients to get back to an active lifestyle and activities.

Watch video case studies and interviews from patients who have returned to sporting activities following the Birmingham Knee Replacement.
 

What are the symptoms of arthritis?

There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis, symptoms vary according to the form of arthritis. Each form affects the body differently.

Arthritic symptoms generally include swelling and pain or tenderness in one or more joints for more than two weeks, redness or heat in a joint, limitation of motion of a joint, early morning stiffness and skin changes, including rashes. If you think you may have the onset of arthritis, then arrange to see your local doctor or GP. Your doctor or GP should be able to refer you for a consultation with Mr McMinn. Please call (+44) 0121 455 0411 or email enquiries@mcminncentre.co.uk for more information.


How can a doctor diagnose arthritis?

 Mr Derek McMinn and his team will be able to diagnose your arthritis/joint problem with a medical history, physical exam and x-rays of the joint (hip or knee). Mr McMinn is extremely experienced in joint replacement and has operated on in excess of 10,000 patients. This experience allows Mr McMinn to choose a treatment option which will offer each individual patient the best possible outcome. Click here to book a consultation with Mr McMinn.

What you can do?

  • Book a consultation with Mr McMinn who will determine the type of arthritis you have and the best treatment option for you.
  • Take advice from Mr McMinn and his team on what to do and medication.
  • To ease the pain or stiffness of the joint, apply heat on the joint for about 15 minutes once or twice a day using a hot water bottle, towel or an infrared lamp.
  • If you are overweight, try to reduce weight to lighten the load on weight-bearing joints
  • Participate in regular exercise

What your doctor can do for you?

Mr McMinn and the team at The McMinn Centre will offer you the best advice for both short-term and long-term treatment of your joint pain. In some case Mr McMinn may advise non-surgical treatment, such as physiotherapy, exercise and weight-loss. In many cases Mr McMinn will suggest the appropriate surgical treatment for your joint pain - this will depend on several factors. All of Mr McMinn's surgeries take place at BMI The Edgbaston Hospital.


Treatment Options

  • The Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) was pioneered by Mr McMinn in 1997 after several years of experimenting with protoypes and trials, to perfect the design. The BHR is the first widely successful hip resurfacing device and continues to perform well across the world. Derek McMinn has an excellent success rate with the BHR - 95.8% from his first 1000 BHRs at 15 years. This incredible survivorship rises to 98% at 15 years when looking at men only.
  • The Birmingham Mid Head Resection (BMHR) is an alternative, bone-conserving hip replacement for young and active patients who are unsuitable for a BHR. The BMHR is the middle stage between the BHR and a Total Hip Replacement (THR) it offers patients with unsuitable bone quality for hip resurfacing an alternative option which offers them the same advantages.
  • Total Hip Replacement Mr McMinn has huge experience offering Total Hip Replacements (THR) to patients suffering from arthritis and other conditions. Tried and tested, the modern THR can also offer excellent results, range of movement and survivorship.
  • The Birmingham Knee Replacement (BKR) is an excellent surgical implant for those suffering from painful arthritis in the knee joint. It's unique design mirrors the natural kinematics of the knee and is anatomically matched. The BKR offers excellent patient satisfaction and an increased range of flexion.

Treatment of osteoarthritis focuses on decreasing pain and improving joint movement, and may include:

  • Exercises to keep joints flexible and improve muscle strength
  • Heat/cold therapy for temporary pain relief
  • Joint protection to prevent strain or stress on painful joints
  • Surgery to relieve chronic pain in damaged joints and restore movement
  • Weight control to prevent extra stress on weight-bearing joints

Does exercise really help those who have arthritis?

Exercise is very important because it increases lubrication of the joints and strengthens the surrounding muscles, putting less stress on joints. Exercise in heated swimming pools-hydrotherapy-can bring enormous relief from pain and stiffness. Also studies have shown that exercise helps people with arthritis by reducing joint pain and stiffness and increasing flexibility, muscle strength and energy. It also helps with weight reduction and offers an improved sense of well-being.
 

Summary

From learning about the importance of exercising regularly to fully understanding your arthritis surgical options, the information contained in this section is meant to provide you with insights, information and tips that can be used by you to help make living with arthritis a little bit more manageable.

For people with arthritis, learning to make it part of your life can be difficult. But learning as much as you can about your particular type of arthritis and actively working with your arthritis treatment team are two very effective ways of regaining control over your life. There is plenty of information, some specific to arthritis and some not, that can be very helpful to someone facing the challenges associated with having a chronic or lifelong disease.

Our suggestion is - don't let arthritis beat you. Take control. How? Speak with an expert such as Mr McMinn, with a wealth of experience behind him, he is well placed to offer advice. Mr McMinn not only operates on patients who need hip resurfacing, hip replacement or knee replacement but is also active in designing the next generation of hip arthroplasty devices.

To book a consultation with Mr McMinn you can do so easily by clicking here to book online, calling (+44) 0121 455 0411 or emailing enquiries@mcminncentre.co.uk.

© The McMinn Centre - Mr Derek McMinn MD FRCS Hip Resurfacing Birmingham UK